Frequently Asked Questions

 
 

Here are some Frequently Asked Questions about:
- Placenta Encapsulation, and
-Birth/Postpartum Doula Services.

Have Other Questions? Contact Us »

 

WHAT IS PLACENTA ENCAPSULATION?

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Placenta Encapsulation provides an easily digested way of consuming placenta. There are two common methods of doing this - Traditional Chinese Medicine Inspired (TCM Inspired) or Raw.

TCM Inspired Placenta Encapsulation is the most common and involves steaming the placenta with herbs (including ginger and myrhh). Once your placenta has been steamed, it is sliced and dehydrated, before being ground and placed in capsules.

The Raw Method skips steaming and dehydrates the placenta, before being ground and placed in capsules.

how long has placenta encapsulation been around?

Although traditionally used in Chinese medicine, the earliest mention of placenta consumption is in a sixteenth-century Chinese medical text (The Compendium of Materia Medica). Moving to modern times and we can see research done from the 1970's onwards on the practice. 

Even today, the practice is largely kept under wraps but is quietly growing in popularity. This is not in the least because of the influence of celebrities like Kim KardashianKourtney KardashianAlicia Silverstone and January Jones reportedly eating their placentas.

SERVICING THE FOLLOWING PERTH HOSPITALS:

Armadale Health Campus
Bentley Hospital
Family Birth Centre (at KEMH)
Fiona Stanley Hospital
Glengarry Private Hospital
Joondalup Private Hospital
King Edward Memorial Hospital
Osborne Park Hospital
Peel Health Campus
Rockingham Hospital
SJOG Murdoch Hospital
SJOG Subiaco Hospital
SJOG  Midland
SJOG Mt Lawley

Plus Homebirths throughout the Central and Southern Suburbs of Perth (including with the Community Midwifery Program).

WHEN IS THE PLACENTA PREPARED?

Ideally, the placenta preparation takes place as soon as possible after delivery, within the first 48 hours, allowing you and baby to benefit from the most potency the placenta has to offer. The first two weeks are the most important and effective time to be taking the placenta, so the sooner the better.

Directly after the birth, the placenta should be placed in an enclosed container (check with your Care Provider to see if your intended place of birth will put it in a plastic container (or just double bag it), or if you need to bring your own, and whether you will need to take an esky with you).

It can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 48 hours. If you know ahead of time that it will not be prepared within that time frame, it is best to place straight into the freezer.

More often than not I am available to start the process within the first 24 hours. but please note that some hospitals will hold the placenta for 24 hours after birth before releasing it.

HOW DO I ASK THE HOSPITAL TO RELEASE MY PLACENTA?

Most hospitals will release the placenta with no issues. You need to ensure that everyone is aware of you plans to take your placenta home with you.

This will include telling your caregiver in advance, as well as detailing it in your birth wishes/birth plan. You may be asked to sign a Release form. If you are told it is not within hospital policy to do so, ask to see a written copy of the policy!

what are your QUALIFICATIONS?.

I trained with Placenta Benefits(PBI), I also hold a current Blood Borne Pathogens (BBP) Certificate as well as Food Safety. This ensures that I conform to local Health Department Guidelines for food preparation and safety protocols.

This allows me to be a Verified Member of Placenta Services Australia a national directory of Placenta Encapsulators. A Verified Member is one that you can trust has up to date qualifications and up to date with the latest safety and sterilisation techniques.

The preparation process is always done in a sterile environment, using sterile equipment specially designed for encapsulation, with love and patience.

what is your REFUND POLICY?

If you choose to cancel after booking or your placenta is sent to pathology (before any placenta collection/preparation has begun) your booking fee will be retained.

This is because I am a trained professional and this is my business (not just a hobby), and like other service businesses it is unlikely that I can fill your booking at a late stage.

I may have turned other enquiries away already, I may have incurred travel or other costs, and I have ongoing costs of maintaining my business such as website, maintaining current certifications, business registration and so on.

After placenta processing has begun, there is no refund payable for change of mind.

 

What does a birth doula do?

BirthWithTheModernDoula

You're craving a positive labour and birth experience (but worried that its near impossible). Desperately seeking a support team that's got your back (without hiring half a football team). Hoping for the best (but fearing the worst).
 
Forget the horror stories that you might have heard, you CAN have the birth that your friends wish they'd had.

I'm here to help you get the birth you want - the kinda birth you'll want a birth photographer on hand for.

I offer private, personalised childbirth education sessions for you and your partner before your birth, so you can be totally prepared.

I'm a Certified Hypno-Doula, so I can support you to use hypnosis in your pregnancy, labour and birth.

I'll be with you throughout your labour and birth and after, giving you continuity of care you won't get elsewhere.

what areas of perth does your birth doula service cover?

I am located in Lakelands, but I commonly work with clients birthing at the Family Birth Centre (Subiaco) and King Edward Memorial Hospital, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Armadale Health Campus, Rockingham Hospital and Peel Health Campus.

I have also been lucky enough to support Perth families birthing at home with both the Community Midwifery Practice (CMP) and Independent Midwives (IM's)

do i need a doula when i have a midwife/student midwife/obstetrician?

Absolutely! The type of care that I provide as your doula is totally non-medical - so you will still require your team of medical care providers. 

Commonly midwives work in shifts, and OB's have on-call periods, so it is often uncertain which care provider you will have. The continuity of care provided by me as your doula is even more important when your midwive had to leave at end of her shift, and now it's the weekend so your OB is not on call.

What kind of births have I supported?

I have supported all types of birth - it's your birth!

  • Hospital births
  • Family Birth Centre
  • Homebirths
  • Community Midwifery Practice Births
  • Independent Midwife Attended Births
  • Natural birth
  • Waterbirth
  • Medicated labour and birth (epidural, gas etc)
  • VBAC (vaginal birth after caesarean)
  • Natural spontaneous labour
  • Induced labour